Tracing Patterns Foundation

Preserving
Documenting 
Sharing Knowledge 
of the Textile Arts

Tracing Patterns Foundation is a community of international scholars, educators, and textile makers who contribute toward building a body of research on traditional practices related to fiber and textiles around the world.

Tracing Patterns Foundation
Berkeley, California 
USA

Textiles Forward

Textiles are tangible markers of culture. More than just clothing, their materials, techniques, construction, patterns and colors reflect the richness of people’s environments, beliefs and values. Today, more than ever, we have the resources, expertise and technology available to redefine how we approach the preservation and protection of these precious examples of human ingenuity and creative expression. 

Many exceptional private collections have outgrown their original circumstances.  Likewise, many collectors are keen to know that their hard work and lifelong dedication will live on to delight, encourage and bring joy to people’s lives for years to come…

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The Collection

The Tracing Patterns Collection represents gifts from our patrons. Our collection aims to build knowledge of traditional textiles and their technique through material cultures. Objects that we collect tell the stories about global cross-cultural influences. They also exemplify the local practices, uses, and values held by the indigenous groups who make them. We use these objects primarily for teaching and research purposes. We incorporate them into lectures and demonstrations, and we use them to create educational content to inspire people to learn more about textiles. In addition, we are donating and loaning some of these materials to assist other educational institutions outside of the United States to build teaching collections.

VISIT THE COLLECTION

Fiber, Loom and Technique Journal

The Fiber, Loom and Technique Journal (FLT) is an online journal that publishes peer-reviewed papers about textiles and fiber technologies, from historical, archaeological, and ethnographic studies. It covers loom and non-loom techniques, and woven and non-woven materials, including basketry and bark cloth. It encompasses a global scope that is not restricted by geography and is aimed at academics as well as laypeople with an interest in textiles.

The journal is open-access, and there are no publication fees. 

Submissions are welcome!

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The O.W. (Bud) Hampton Archive

In December 2020, we received a large gift of Papua materials from the Hampton Family, collected by Dr. O. W. Hampton in the Highlands of Papua, Indonesia, over an 18-year period (1982-1999).

The gift comprises approximately 1000 artifacts from daily and ritual lives, including stone tools and fiber materials. In addition, there are more than 20,000 color slides, 200 sounds recordings on cassette tape made in the field, and meticulous research notes.

Today we are cataloging and conserving the collection for future generations, and we are trying to find a permanent home for it…

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Hampton Archive

The Annual Report

  • Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
  • Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
  • Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
  • The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
  • A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
  • 'Morning Sea,' 1915. Silk embroidery by Hasio Kiyoshi (1888-1964). Collection of Allentown Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008.7

This screen with the highly realistic silk embroidery of waves was exhibited at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The work would have taken 2-3 years to finish and required more than 250 different color blue and grey shades of silks.

This amazing embroidery is part of the Exhibit "Meiji Modern: Fifty Years of New Japan" which runs from 03 October 2023 - 07 January 2024 at the Asia Society New York.
  • COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id 

Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves.

Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
Ice Tede Dara, a dedicated practitioner that continues to weave the traditional Sabu patterns using natural plant-based dyes. Not only skilled in weaving, Ice also inherits the history embedded in Sabu textiles, which serve as the identity of the Sabu community. Last week, Ice attended the Savu Textiles and Cotton Spinning event held in @parara.id Ice also provided explanations about Sabu textiles and demonstrated the weaving techniques involved in creating them. The audience was very enthusiastic about being able to try and practice the techniques themselves. Thank you to all the organizers and contributor of this event @parara.id @perkumpulanwastraindonesia @mtmindonesia @tewunirai
2 months ago
View on Instagram |
1/7
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. 

Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level.

The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7).

In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9).

Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue.

@museum
@museumkebaharianjkt
Iwan Yusuf’s net and multimedia work from the “Garis Ombak” series (image 1) is aptly on permanent display at the Maritime Museum (image 2) in Sunda Kelapa harbor, Jakarta, Indonesia. This museum showcases a collection of traditional boats from across Nusantara and the history of Indonesia’s spice route (images 3, 4). The museum buildings were originally colonial warehouses used by the Dutch to collect, dry, and store spices before shipping them to Europe. Image 5 shows the third floor of the building where spices were laid out to air dry. Have you noticed that the first-floor windows are very low to the ground (images 6)? This is because the area is prone to flooding, so the ground floor was raised up by 1.5 meters from its original level. The only preserved section of the original wall that once enclosed Batavia city is located here (image 7). In 2018, the museum experienced a significant fire. Today, a Memorial Room stands in the section impacted by the fire to raise awareness about fire hazards. This room narrates the story of the incident and displays numerous charred architectural elements (images 8,9). Oddly, the building’s walls have been actively releasing salts, particularly in the section affected by the fire, which has resulted in the peeling of stucco and paint layers (image 10). As of yet, the museum is still looking for a good solution to address this issue. @museum @museumkebaharianjkt
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
2/7
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. 

#textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
Textiles donated by the Tracing Patterns Foundation to the Institute Technology Bandung (ITB) on Feb 1, 2024. They are fine examples from South Sumatra, Central Java, Flores, Borneo, Sumba, and Savu, collected in the 1980s in Indonesia. They were gifts from US donors: Beverly Payeff-Massey, Vickie Elson, and Joel Confino. Thank you to Kiki Rizky Soetisna (2nd image on the right) and Bintan Titisari for organizing the textiles donation to ITB. #textiledesign diplomacy #textilesforward
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
3/7
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. 

As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
The return of nearly 500 cultural objects, taken by the Dutch Government over centuries, marks a significant moment for Indonesia. The “Pameran Repatriasi” exhibition gains particular importance, especially in the aftermath of the recent Museum Nasional fire. As guardians of their national heritage, Indonesia welcomes back treasures like the “Lombok treasure,” looted in 1894, along with a Klungkung kingdom “keris” dagger, four 13th-century Javanese Hindu kingdom Singasari statues, and the Pita Maha collection showcasing 132 pieces of modern Balinese art. This signifies a crucial step in Indonesia embracing its responsibility to preserve its rich cultural legacy.
6 months ago
View on Instagram |
4/7
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
A DARK, A LIGHT, A BRIGHT: THE DESIGNS OF DOROTHY LIEBES, on view at the Cooper Hewitt Nasional Design Museum, New York, through February 4, 2024.
7 months ago
View on Instagram |
5/7
'Morning Sea,' 1915. Silk embroidery by Hasio Kiyoshi (1888-1964). Collection of Allentown Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008.7

This screen with the highly realistic silk embroidery of waves was exhibited at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The work would have taken 2-3 years to finish and required more than 250 different color blue and grey shades of silks.

This amazing embroidery is part of the Exhibit "Meiji Modern: Fifty Years of New Japan" which runs from 03 October 2023 - 07 January 2024 at the Asia Society New York.
'Morning Sea,' 1915. Silk embroidery by Hasio Kiyoshi (1888-1964). Collection of Allentown Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008.7

This screen with the highly realistic silk embroidery of waves was exhibited at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The work would have taken 2-3 years to finish and required more than 250 different color blue and grey shades of silks.

This amazing embroidery is part of the Exhibit "Meiji Modern: Fifty Years of New Japan" which runs from 03 October 2023 - 07 January 2024 at the Asia Society New York.
'Morning Sea,' 1915. Silk embroidery by Hasio Kiyoshi (1888-1964). Collection of Allentown Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008.7

This screen with the highly realistic silk embroidery of waves was exhibited at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The work would have taken 2-3 years to finish and required more than 250 different color blue and grey shades of silks.

This amazing embroidery is part of the Exhibit "Meiji Modern: Fifty Years of New Japan" which runs from 03 October 2023 - 07 January 2024 at the Asia Society New York.
'Morning Sea,' 1915. Silk embroidery by Hasio Kiyoshi (1888-1964). Collection of Allentown Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Van Santvoord, 2008.7 This screen with the highly realistic silk embroidery of waves was exhibited at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The work would have taken 2-3 years to finish and required more than 250 different color blue and grey shades of silks. This amazing embroidery is part of the Exhibit "Meiji Modern: Fifty Years of New Japan" which runs from 03 October 2023 – 07 January 2024 at the Asia Society New York.
7 months ago
View on Instagram |
6/7
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design

21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy.

An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence.

Images:

1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess.
2. A view of an exhibition room.
3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition.
4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85).
5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'.
6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple.
7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women.
8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868).
9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899)
10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’.

@ashmoleanmuseumoxford
COLOUR REVOLUTION: Victorian Art, Fashion & Design 21 September 2023 – 18 February 2024 at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. We often associate the Victorian Era (1837-1901) in England with the color black, as Queen Victoria wore it in mourning for her husband, Prince Albert, for the rest of her life. However, this era was also a time of significant discovery and experimentation with colors. During this period, there was a fascination with vibrant colors derived from nature, often obtained from animals and insects such as hummingbird and peacock feathers, as well as beetle wings. In 1856, William Henry Perkin made a groundbreaking discovery by creating a synthetic aniline purple dye from coal tar. This dye became commercially available in 1858 and paved the way for the production of a wide range of brilliant synthetic dyes. By the 1860s, fashionable individuals in England wore a variety of bright colors, which some critics considered them too flashy. An important symbol of this new era of chromatic colors was the International Exhibition held in 1862 in South Kensington. By the end of the Victorian era, certain colors like yellow and green became associated with aestheticism and decadence. Images: 1. Detail of an embroidery from a ball gown designed by the House of Worth, Paris (1897) for a Duchess. 2. A view of an exhibition room. 3. Colorful peacock porcelain by Minton company (1873) against the background image of the 1862 International Exhibition. 4. An Egyptian-style necklace, tiara, and earrings adorned with dried iridescent body of beetles, made by Philipps Brothers & Son, London (1884-85). 5. Exhibition panel, 'Colour for the Masses'. 6. Day dress (1865-70) dyed with coal-tar based aniline purple. 7. Chromatic color socks popular with both young men and women. 8. Fabric samples dyed with coal tar dyes (circa 1868). 9. Painting by Ramon Cass titled ‘Decadent young woman after the dance’ (1899) 10. Exhibition panel, Colour Revolution’. @ashmoleanmuseumoxford
7 months ago
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